Autism Support

On April 21, 2010, in Autism Children, by Susi Irawati

Our Support is important for Autism Individual

By Admin

Characteristics of Autistic Children

-Social skills deficits, engaging in repetitive activities and movements.

Most Common Problems in Children with Autism

Autistic children will communicate with behavior, rather than words, through the following actions:

Crying, screaming, kicking, hitting, biting, scratching, head butting, hair pulling, pinching, pushing, singing, throwing Items, stripping, spitting, vomiting, head banging, power snotting.

In trying to understand such behavior, it is best to understand what function the behavior serves. Getting Attention: Their behavior gets them noticed, just as any child wants attention.

Self-Stimulation: Sensory perceptions may be dulled and this provides them with needed stimulation.

In trying to correct such behavior, mainstream methods do not apply because a number of factors come into play with autistic children. Monitor the child to see if something triggers such behavior.

Listen to the parents or teacher’s advice.

Salty snack

Videos

Small toy

Small length of string

Families of children with autism can benefit from support

 Autism Support

support for autism


This rate of growth in autism not only signifies a need for more professionals to be trained to teach individuals with autism, but the need for increased training and support for families of children with autism. Families of children with autism can benefit from support from professionals, other family members, and society, in order to manage the stress effectively.

Parents of children with autism take on many roles in their child’s education. Due to the stress level of raising a child with autism, parents need coping skills (National Academy Press, 2001). As with other parents of children with disabilities, many parents or children with autism go through a grieving process after receiving the diagnosis of autism.

Research conducted by Holroyd and McArthur in 1976 and by Donovan in 1988 (as cited by the Autism Society of America, n.d.) found that parents of children with autism experience greater stress than parents of children with mental retardation and Down Syndrome. This stress may be a result of the maladaptive and antisocial behaviors a child with autism may exhibit (Autism Society of America, n.d.). The child with autism may exhibit frustration through self-injurious behaviors, aggression, or tantrums that threaten the safety of others (Autism Society of America, n.d.). Some children with autism have difficulties sleeping and may only eat limited food items, which causes another source of struggle for parents (Autism Society of America, n.d.). Sleep deprivation is common in both the child with autism and the parents of the child. Families may not go to family get- togethers because the child has difficulty interacting with others (Autism Society of America, n.d.). There are currently many treatment approaches and strategies to teach children with autism. Because many children with autism have difficulty generalizing skills, it is extremely important for parents to carry over the child’s skill training from school to the home. Parents can also be effective teachers.

A family centered educational approach may be the most beneficial to a child with autism and their families (National Academy Press, 2001). Informal support may come through parent networking, parent support groups, families, and neighbors. Coping with a child with autism is difficult and stressful for many families.

Check the signs of autism here.

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2 Responses to “Autism Support”

  1. […] affects the rest of your family. Autism affects your entire family so everyone could use some support. Encourage family members to join support groups for people who have autism […]

  2. […] be autistic all over their lives. That makes the families that dealing with autism need help and support as they might be under a great deal of stress so that they need all the non judgmental help from […]

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